One Year Out: Has Gibson Really Turned Over A New Leaf?

When I first started writing this article, I thought I was going to be rehashing some old material about Gibson (under owner Henry Juszkiewicz) and one particular completely crappy business practice: "The Bumblebee Capacitors".

But while doing research for that article (the bumblebee capacitors debacle is still a pretty interesting and an instructive case study), I was lead to a whole lot of other things: namely the information that is now this article. Most notably that there was a whole chain of events, playing out across several years, under Juszkiewicz's leadership that caused the failure of Gibson, and the forced sale that threw "Henry J" out, and that brought in new investors and new company leadership. Early last month, it had been a year since Gibson went through that ownership and leadership change.

Henry Juszkiewicz acquired Gibson in 1986 for $5m. 5 Million Dollars. That's it. Now, 1986 is quite a bit different from 2019 in terms of how much inflation has devalued the dollar, but $5 million still seems a pittance given the storied Gibson name...

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What Happened to Rock Music?

"What Happened to Rock Music? Will It Ever Come Back?"
by Ben Kleschinsky, studied at Nashua Community College

I think (I have a good set of reasons why) rock music and the local music scene in general really disappeared. You have to understand the economics of the whole situation, and why in the 90’s we started seeing rock bands getting little exposure.

So to begin we have to look at the music scene in the 1950’s, 60’s, and 70’s and look at what allowed rock music to dominate economically. It had to do with our FCC. Not many people know this because of a media blackout.

Think of personalities such as Cousin Brucie, Wolfman Jack, Pat St. John, Tom Kelly, Johnny Holliday, and Dave Hull. If the people liked what they heard, you moved up the ladder. It was a form of music democracy, the people not corporations were in control.

Heavy Music and Its Popularity
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Tom Tom Drums: Sizing and Other Considerations

Like many drummers, I’ve not given a lot of thought to drum sizes other than small drums have a higher pitch and large drums have a lower pitch. I bought my last kit because its made of Birch and did not pay much attention to the tom tom diameters. After all, It has a small tom, a medium tom and a large tom. What else do I need to know? I’ve looked at some of the big drum companies to see how they dimension their drums. I’d like to make my drums similar to the industry standards. It turns out there are a few different sizing schemes in use by the big manufacturers.

Traditional Tom Tom Drum Measurements Chart
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DIY Drum Shells

Being a woodworker of sorts, I have been itching lately to make my own drum kit. There are several options for making your own kit. You can buy shells already made and add the hardware and finish or you can attempt to make the shells yourself.
A few months ago, I decided to order the shells already made from a drum making supply company. Of course, they still have not arrived and I'm not sure if they actually will arrive. Custom drum stuff seems to take a ridiculously long time. I ordered a custom floor tom from Pearl years ago and it took about 7 months to get it.

Building a DIY Drum From Scratch Using Maple Staves
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Rick Allen and Thoughts on Electronic Drum Kits

On Saturday, my wife and I went up to The Forum in Los Angeles to see the final night of the Journey / Def Leppard tour. As a drummer, I was very interested in the difference between Rick Allen’s (Def Leppard) kit and Steve Smith’s (Journey). As most everyone knows, in 1985, Rick Allen lost his left arm in a very tragic car accident. As a result, he plays a highly modified kit that allows him to use both of his feet and his right arm to compensate. (he does this very well, in fact. His playing today is just as good as it ever was.).

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"Warped Plywood", or "How to Build an Instrument Service Pad From Scrap", Part 2

Here's the 2nd half of our "how to make an instrument work pad from warped plywood" article. Candidly, we think it's a little boring, but we also think the information that's provided in the article, should you retain it(!) will help with your possible future musical performance endeavors. Dealing with warped/bowed plywood is likely going to be something you may have to deal with more than you thought you might... It's happened to us!

Here's the first article if you're coming into this halfway...

Opposite bowed pieces of plywood
Carpet affixed to the plywood slab
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"Warped Plywood", or "How to Build an Instrument Service Pad From Scrap", Part 1

The impetus for this article came about from a scrap piece of shag carpet that I'd collected and the happenstance of some pieces of plywood that were slightly bent but that were workable and that came my way in the past 30 days or so.

"Huh?", is what I hear you saying in your head right now.

Let's take a step back. In the process of building a business that mostly centers around renting out older tube amps, it follows that we also work on our own personal electric instruments. At the end of the day, we don't just love heavy music, we love playing it.

Diagram on how Plywood is made
Diagram on how plies in plywood should be arranged
Demostration of Bowing in Plywood
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Firefox Blocking Twitter Feed

People (mostly us!) have been having a problem with Firefox blocking the Twitter feed on various websites (OURS!) that aren't "Twitter". We ran into a similar problem ourselves. This has to do with the tracking protection feature that's been updated on Firefox. It took some digging but we've figured out how to re-enable the twitter feed if you're using Firefox and have Tracking Protection enabled. You can either take this to heart, or not but we're not tracking you, so please feel free to disable Tracking Protection from this site.

Firefox Disabled Twitter Feed
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